Date: Wed, 18 Aug 1999 13:21:43 -0600

From: Wildlands CPR/ROAD-RIP <WildlandsCPR@wildrockies.org>

Subject: road ripper's alert

Howdy folks -

It's been quite a while since we've put out an alert on this e-mail

network. Sorry for neglecting it. But we have a bunch of information to

share with you and one alert as well.

In this "alert," you'll find the following:

1. Wildlands CPR job announcement

2. New information available on Wildlands CPR website

3. southern california road alert - letter writing request

Happy Ripping-

The folks at Wildlands CPR

____________________________________________________

1. Wildlands CPR Job Announcement

Job Description

ORV Campaign Coordinator

Wildlands Center for Preventing Roads (Wildlands CPR) revives and protects

wild places by promoting road removal and revegetation, preventing road

construction and limiting motorized recreation. We are a national

clearinghouse and resource center for information and resources to help

individuals fight roads and motorized recreation.

Wildlands CPR is looking for an energetic, motivated, self-directed,

experienced, ORV Campaign Coordinator to develop and implement a national

campaign to challenge off-road vehicle abuse of public lands. Working

together with several regional (e.g. MT Wilderness Society, SUWA) and

national (e.g. Wilderness Society, American Lands Alliance) organizations,

we are already involved in many aspects of this campaign and have a working

campaign plan, though it is still in the beginning stages. In addition, we

have a resource specialist developing activist tools for challenging ORVs.

A visionary ORV Campaign Coordinator will shape and develop this campaign

and Wildlands CPR's niche within it.

Specifically, the ORV Campaign Coordinator will:

1) Develop and implement an ambitious, multi-year campaign to limit ORV use

on National Forests, BLM and Park Service land;

2) Work with grassroots organizations and individuals throughout the nation

to help them participate locally and contribute effectively to the national

campaign to limit ORV use of public lands;

3) Plan and implement campaign-related media and organizing efforts; and

4) Work out of either the Missoula, MT or Boulder, CO offices of Wildlands

CPR; and travel extensively (up to 1/4 of time) to work directly with

grassroots and national organizations to plan and implement this campaign.

In addition to his/her main responsibilities, the ORV Campaign Coordinator

will also:

1) Work with the Director and Development Director to develop the major

fundraising strategy for this campaign;

2) Meet with foundations and major donors to articulate the nature and

strategic importance of this campaign; and

3) Provide articles for our print and e-mail newsletters regarding the ORV

campaign.

We desire the following experience and qualities in the ORV Campaign

Coordinator:

At least 2 years previous experience with national or major regional

campaigns;

Experience in collaboratively planning strategy for campaigns;

Experience in public speaking/written communications;

Knowledge/understanding of conservation biology;

Ability and desire to travel as much as 1/4 of the year;

Motivation and enthusiasm; and

Demonstrated commitment to grassroots environmental work.

This is a permanent, full-time staff position, with health care provided.

Salary range $25-28,000 DOE. Send cover letter, resume and contact

information for three references familiar with your

campaign/grassroots/public work by September 15, 1999 to Wildlands CPR: PO

Box 7516; Missoula, MT 59807; 406/543-9551; WildlandsCPR@wildrockies.org

(hard copy applications preferred, though feel free to contact us by e-mail

for other questions).

 

__________________________

2. New information available on Wildlands CPR website

 

Jim Coefield just completed adding quite a bit of information to the Wildlands

Center for Preventing Roads website that may be of use to you. If you have

questions about this material, please direct them to

WildlandsCPR@wildrockies.org

The additions include the following:

There are three sections of Notes from their newsletter, the Road RIPorter,

Bibliography Notes, Legal Notes, and Field Notes. The Notes include full

citations, with bibliographies and legal references. The Field Notes are 8

1/2 x 11 PDFs that can be printed out and used by field activists for

monitoring and other purposes.

Here is a listing of what's available:

Bibliography Notes

(http://www.wildrockies.org/WildCPR/biblionotes/biblio-index.html):

* Road Removal Helps Restore Watersheds (report too). Oetzmann. v1.2

* ORVs Erode Fragile Desert Soil. Walder. v1.3

* Snowmobiles Stress Wildlife in Winter. Smith & Everett. v1.4

* Roads Impact Elk Habitat, Decrease Wildlife Security. Walder. v1.5

* ORV Effects on Appalachian Ecosystems (forest ecosystems).

Chinn, Fristch & Kalisz. v1.6

* Like Oil and Water: Roads and Tundra Don't Mix. Walder. v1.7

* Roads and Habitat Fragmentation (report too). Cottrell. v2.1

* Roads and Weeds: Partners in Crime. Macfarlane. v2.3

* Roads and Wetlands. Walder. v2.4

* Roads and Erosion (mass wasting/surface erosion). Bagley. v2.5

* Carnivores and Roads: Driving Away our Wild Cats. Lambertson. v2.6

* Roads and Exotic Plants, Pests and Pathogens (good). Ebersberger. v3.1

* Roads and Toxic Pollutants. Wood. v3.2

* Roads Kill: Grizzly Bears and the Effects of Human Access. Willcox. v3.3

* Tooth and Claw: Ecological Effects of Roads on Predators. Havlick. v3.4

* So Why Didn't the Toad Cross the Road (amphibians and rds.). Jensen. v3.5

* Think Like a River: The Cumulative Effects of Roads on Aquatic Systems.

Hitt. v3.6

* ORV Pollution. Smith. v4.1

* Roads: A Big Impact on Small Mammals. Randgaard. v4.2

* "Oh Deer" Mule Deer and Highways. Jensen. v4.3

Legal Notes (http://www.wildrockies.org/WildCPR/legalnotes/legal-index.html):

* Section 4(f) Can Protect Public Parks from Development. Belmont. v1.5

* "Ghost Roads" Lead Forest Service to Court. Bahr & Stotter. v1.6

* Riparian Zone Regs Ripe for Rippers. Broberg. v1.7

* A Brief Introduction to NEPA Act of 1969. Maddock. v2.1

* Legal Status of Snowmobiles and Their Effect on Bison in YNP. Barnes. v2.2

* Executive Orders and ORV's. Cottrell. v2.4

* RS 2477. Hoskisson. v2.5

* Protecting Public Lands from Motorized Recreation. Forsgaard. v2.6

* Lawsuit Dead End Road for Snowmobiles. Smith. v3.2

* Motorized Issues Ripe for Review. Maddock. v3.4

* Court Agrees with SUWA: Canyonlands NP Must Close Salt Creek to Jeeps.

MacIntosh. v3.6

* The Clean Water Act and Off-Road Vehicles. Smith. v4.2

Field Notes (http://www.wildrockies.org/WildCPR/field-notes/field-index.html):

* Motorized Vehicle Vandalism/Trespass Incident Report Form. v2.3

* Dr. Splatt: "Count two roadkills and call me in the morning."

(Roadkill Data Sheet). v3.1

* Blowing Smoke and Throwing Seeds: Spotting Pathetic Reveg Plans.

VanderMeer. v3.3

* Intro Guide to Wildland Road Removal. v3.5

* Travelway and Road Closure Inventory Form. Smith. v4.1

* Gallatin National Forest Trail User Survey. Roads Scholar Project. v4.3

10 reports (http://www.wildrockies.org/WildCPR/edu.html):

* The Ecological Effects of Roads

* Commonly Asked Questions about the Emergency Relief for Federally Owned

(ERFO) fund

* Fact sheet on Forest Roads

* Recreation Fee Demonstration Program: A Critique

* KUFM commentary 8-13-98 by Bethanie Walder

* KUFM Montana Evening Edition Commentary on wildland roads by Bethanie Walder

* Trends in Public Lands Recreation

* A Draft Review and Comment on: Forest Service Roads: A Synthesis of

Scientific Information, 2nd Draft, USDA Forest Service by Jack Wade

(ecological impacts)

* A Review and Comment on: Forest Service Roads: A Synthesis of Scientific

Information, 2nd Draft, USDA Forest Service by Daniel Brister

(socio-economic impacts)

* Glossary of National Forest Road Definitions

_________________________

3. Southern California alert

Letter Writing Alert

PRIVATE DEVELOPERS WANT NON-PROFIT STATUS

Hi everyone,

I am writing with an important request. California Transportation

Ventures, the developers who want to build the proposed 10-lane tollway,

State Route 125 South, are asking the IRS for Non-Profit status!!! They

have recently approached SANDAG and asked for a letter of support. SANDAG

agreed to send the letter saying that they deserve non-profit status

because the construction of the tollway will "lessen the burden of

government."

Well, it's a sham, and what better way to deal with this than to write

letters to the IRS ourselves. Please take a few moments to write a letter

to the IRS as an individual, or on behalf of your organizations, using the

following information.

If you need more information, please contact me at:

Allison Rolfe

(619) 223-9218

arolfe@sw-center.org

Please send two copies of you letter (one to each of the following

addresses (just to be sure)):

Internal Revenue Service

P.O. Box 192

Covington, KY 41012-0192

AND,

The Honorable Charles Rossotti

Commissioner, Internal Revenue Service

1111 Constitution Ave., N.W. Room 3000

Washington, DC 20224

Here are some talking points, and a sample letter below:

Please feel free to use any or all of these points, and create some of your

own! This is outrageous!

* Non-profit organizations receive this designation only if they meet the

standards of a "public benefit corporation." The proposed ten-lane tollway

will: pollute the Sweetwater Reservoir, increase air pollution, increase

congestion (because this project will create far more traffic than it will

alleviate), open up Otay Mesa to development, and sacrifice open space and

quality of life to sprawl. These are not in the public's best interest.

They do not constitute a "public benefit."

* Non-Profit status should be reserved for public benefit organizations,

rather than private for-profit developers that want to lower costs.

* A similar tollway in Orange County with similar projected costs

(approximately $350 million) is now $1.5 billion in debt because of low

ridership/usage. Bad investment ideas should not be bailed out with

taxpayer money.

* The proposed tollway will not "lessen the burden of government." The

first mile will be built with taxpayer money and will cost the government

$132 million.

* The IRS should not get behind a project which has been condemned

consistently by the Federal Environmental Protection Agency.

* Allowing this for-profit corporation to use tax-exempt bonds will

decrease government revenue. How much will this cost the taxpayer?

* The IRS should not consider this application prior to the completion of

the environmental analysis. The proposed project has yet to meet the

requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act and the California

Environmental Quality Act.

**SAMPLE LETTER** (just focus in on any one point, if you like)

Internal Revenue Service

P.O. Box 192

Covington, KY 41012-0192

RE: SAN MIGUEL MOUNTAIN PUBLIC TOLLWAY CORPORATION

Ladies and Gentlemen:

I am writing to urge you to deny the application for tax-exempt status

under Section 501 (c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code submitted by the San

Miguel Mountain Public Tollway Corporation. The "Public Tollway

Corporation" is in fact another name for California Transportation Ventures

(CTV), a private, for-profit corporation, seeking to build a ten-lane

tollway through the undeveloped portion of south San Diego County.

CTV has argued before local government bodies in San Diego, that their

application for non-profit status is justified on the basis that it

"lessens the burden of government." This argument is false. The tollway

will in fact create a financial burden for government. The government will

conservatively pay for 1/3 of this project which is expected to cost at

least $400 million. $132 million of taxpayer money has been earmarked for

the first mile of the road. Additionally, tax-free bonds would decrease

government revenue, costing government and taxpayers another untold sum of

money.

Not only is it untrue that this project "lessens the burden of government,"

other governmental agencies have consistently criticized the plan. The

Environmental Protection Agency has rated the environmental reports

"inadequate" twice, and has raised many serious concerns about the project.

The Sweetwater Authority, locally, has raised many issues about the

potential contamination of the Sweetwater Reservoir which would be likely

to result from the construction of the toll road. Should taxpayers

subsidize a road criticized by these agencies?

Letters on the record, public testimony, and the environmental documents,

themselves, identify many potential consequences of this tollway. They

include: the potential for polluted drinking water; increased air

pollution; increased congestion (because this project will create far more

traffic than it will alleviate); the opening up of Otay Mesa to

development, one of the last large undeveloped areas in San Diego; the

loss of open space and quality of life to be replaced by sprawl; and the

destruction of endangered species. These conditions are not a public

benefit. California Transportation Ventures should not be granted the

status usually reserved for "public benefit corporations," for the

construction of their environmentally devastating tollway.

I also strongly caution you against considering this application prior to

the completion of the environmental documentation for this proposed

project. No final decision has been made regarding whether this project

complies with the National Environmental Policy Act, or the California

Environmental Quality Act.

California Transportation Ventures has used AB 680 (Chapter 107, California

Statues of 1989) as a justification for their application. As they

describe it, AB 680 is "legislation designed to help increase the

development of needed transportation facilities within the State of

California." The key word in the previous statement is "needed." AB 680

specifically prohibits the construction of transportation facilities in

anticipation of future growth. It is only to be used to justify

transportation facilities that are needed to alleviate existing traffic.

The area through which the tollway is proposed to traverse is largely

undeveloped. It is east of the urbanized area. In fact, the tollway,

itself, will open this area up for development which would be prohibited

otherwise. The Environmental Protection Agency still questions the need

for this project, and several alternatives have yet to be analyzed.

A similar tollroad in Orange County, with similar ridership projections and

similar cost estimates is now $1.5 billion dollars in debt because

ridership turned out to be much lower than projected.

Thank you for taking the time to consider these comments. We urge you to

deny the application submitted by the San Miguel Mountain Public Tollway

Corporation/California Transportation Ventures (CTV).

Sincerely,

 

 

cc: The Honorable Charles Rossotti, Commissioner

Internal Revenue Service

1111 Constitution Ave, N.W. Room 3000

Washington, DC 20224

********************************************

Wildlands Center for Preventing Roads

Wildlands CPR

PO Box 7516

Missoula, MT 59807

406/543-9551

mailto:WildlandsCPR@wildrockies.org

http://www.wildrockies.org/WildCPR/